Asking behavioural questions in an interview for Facilities Management Jobs

Maxwell Stephens know that Facilities management is a very critical aspect of operating any kind of building, whether it’s a sporting arena, a hospital or an Office Complex. Whilst there are a number of FM jobs out there, many of them have very different needs. A person who has been an FM director for years may not actually be qualified to be a director of one kind of site because of their personality and attributes. It is therefore critical to include behavioural questions in an interview.


Behavioural questions for jobs in facilities management revolve around asking open-ended questions where the candidate must give examples. This includes discussing a particular situation, going into detail about the tasks, talking about the actions they took and what the end result was. This will give you the chance to see how a candidate would handle a particular situation should they be hired – and determine if it is the right way based upon how you operate your business.


What behavioural questions to ask when recruiting for Facilities Management Jobs

You need to think about what kinds of facilities management jobs you’re recruiting for and what the important competencies are. This could include risk-taking, respect, empathy and various other competencies. Make a list of 5 or 10 competencies and then base the questions around these in order to get the most out of the interview.


If you have a very specific protocol to follow, then you may want to ask a question about their ability to follow instructions. You can be direct and ask how well they follow instructions. This will likely result in a very simple answer of “very well.” You won’t learn much about the candidate. You could also ask “when is a time you took a risk and did it pay off?” By asking an open ended question, you get an opportunity to open the floor and have some dialogue.


Why when recruiting for the best FM Jobs should we ask behavioural questions

Over 30% of employers are asking behavioural questions in interviews these days because there are more and more candidates applying to FM jobs than ever before. In facilities management recruitment, you need a way to narrow down the field beyond just education and experience. Further, you want to ensure that the person is capable of following your rules and handling certain situations with finesse.

Facilities management is comprised of a number of different skills. Some of the skills can easily be identified through experience and education. How a person will handle a leadership role, command respect or deal with clients, however, is a completely different scenario. By asking behavioural questions, it can provide insight into how a candidate will perform the job to the company standards.


It’s important to make the most out of an interview. Yes and no questions don’t really identify potential issues. Open-ended behavioural questions, however, provide a lot of detail about a person so that a lot more hiring mistakes can be avoided than by not asking any at all.


Peter Forshaw, Managing Director, Maxwell Stephens