Why using recruiters in the Recruitment Process is worth it

In the Recruitment Process – Why Recruiters Are Worth What They Charge

The Value House from Maxwell Stephens

Let’s picture the scenario. You’ve got a vacancy that needs filling and you have a decision to make – conduct the recruitment process in-house, or partner with a professional recruiter?

It may initially seem that performing the search in-house using existing staff makes more sense than spending money on an external recruiter. However, for many the benefits of using recruiters far out outweigh the cost savings associated with using existing staff. In most cases, using inexperienced staff can actually be counter-productive and end up costing the business far more in the long run.

When it comes to finding the ideal candidate for a job vacancy, recruiters know what they are doing. They often have specialist areas that they are familiar with, meaning they know the skills and experience that is required for a specific industry, and will know the exact people they are looking for. Recruiters may also be aware of inside information relevant to the industry, or may have knowledge of how to perfectly pitch a company’s jobs against their competitors.

On the flipside, allocating the lengthy recruitment process to existing line managers takes them away from their normal business. The vacancy will need to be advertised, CVs sifted through, applicants corresponded with, references checked and so on, causing a drain on both time and money. As a result, this often means higher costs than would be spent on professional recruiters. Advertising alone can cost hundreds, even thousands, of pounds and achieve lesser results than those of a recruiter. Even posting on a job site is generally paid for and does little to actually search for the talent. On top of this, other admin costs will of course be involved including travel and lodging, entertainment, source development, telephone charges, office space, postage and PR literature.

Recruiters not only have a pre-existing database of potential employees to search through, but are able to search and source new candidates. While posting on a job site will attract active jobseekers, recruiters are able to tap into inactive, or passive, talent that may be invisible to others. Inactive or passive talent can include candidates that are currently in employment but looking to change – candidates that clearly have potential, but would not otherwise be picked up by a recruitment search. Recruiters are also often able to source someone who is more able to dive straight into the job with little or no training, avoiding candidates who will need weeks or months to confidently fill the position.

Recruiters also know how to advertise a job, what to say and where to advertise. They know how to attract the right talent for the right industries, and make sure your vacancy is seen by the candidates you want.

Alternatively, recruiters can forgo conventional advertising completely, sourcing candidates instead through their own searches. Private information can easily be leaked when advertising in-house, whereas recruiters can keep details about the vacancy private from current staff, as well as holding back information about the company from the candidate.

A company performing their own recruitment search will normally spend at least 10 hours doing so*. Recruiters speed the process up and have a shortlist ready much quicker than an inexperienced employee performing the same search. Professional recruiters know how to speak to candidates and get the most out of them before they advance to the next stage. If not enough has been done to ‘grab’ the candidate, then they could well opt to work for a competitor who is recruiting for a similar position, and you could find yourself losing your preferred employee.

Negotiation can be overlooked during the recruitment process, but recruiters are able to negotiate between employer and candidate in order to meet the client’s needs. The favoured candidate may be pitching for a higher salary than the company had intended, and it is this difficult situation that needs to be resolved in order to find a happy medium.

Perhaps most importantly, recruiters will provide unbiased third-party input during the recruitment process. Recruiters examine candidates before they reach the employer, selecting them out of the essential criteria the employer has outlined, as well as some key criteria they may have overlooked. As well as this, recruiters are able to give reliable and honest feedback, as some people find it very difficult to give bad news. Honest feedback is an important step in the recruitment process, even for the unsuccessful candidate, and everyone involved in the process should be aware of where they stand, including the employer.

So whilst it may seem that keeping the recruitment process in-house is more cost effective, the longer-term implications are far reaching. From loss of potential business through employees being distracted away from their core roles to missing out on core talent, to the potential legal implications for mismanaging the handling of candidates. What is clear is that there is much more to the recruitment process than meets the eye, and organisations who choose to manage the process themselves should take extra care to ensure they address all of these factors.

* As quoted by aspire personnel ltd

Peter Forshaw is Managing Director of Maxwell Stephens Recruitment – The Facilities Management Matching Specialists